Capilano Universe Archive

      • 2017 SEASON

        THURSDAY, JANUARY 19
        West Vancouver Memorial Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        1950 Marine Drive, WV

        Forever Young: How Health Practices Can Have a Positive Effect on Aging

        Aging is an inevitable part of living: from the greying of hair to the wrinkling of skin. But, aging doesn’t have to be an uncontrolled descent into frailty and oblivion. This talk will explore some of the changes that can happen in your bones, muscles, heart, digestive system and brain as you age. It will also address strategies and behaviours that you can employ to promote good health at any age.

        Dr Jerome Genz

        Presenter: Dr. Jerome Genz

        Dr. Jerome Genz, B.Sc. (Kinesiology), DC (Chiropractic) has been a health and fitness educator for over 30 years. At Capilano University he teaches anatomy, sports injuries and nutrition courses in the Human Kinetics department. As a practicing chiropractor he has seen first-hand how health and fitness strategies enhance the quality of life no matter at what life stage they are embarked upon. When he is not marking or seeing patients, Jerome practices what he preaches, enjoying an active, healthy life!


        WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Lynn Valley Main Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        1277 Lynn Valley Road, NV

        Strumming Through History: How the Music of the Guitar Echoes Spanish and South American History

        From the aristocratic dignity of the early Spanish Renaissance’s strict polyphony to the exotic, virtuosic syncopations of the modern Tango, the Chacarera, and flamenco Soleares, this lecture and musical demonstration traces the diverse course of the guitar in the culture of Spain and South America. This presentation will examine how the politics, church and society of the time and place helped to form the boundaries and eccentricities of the music.

        Stephen Boswell

        Presenter: Stephen Boswell

        Born in Northampton, England. Stephen began to play the guitar at age eight. He has studied with such eminent guitarists as Jose Tomas, Oscar Ghiglia, Leo Brouwer and Manuel Barrueco. Stephen has played many concert tours in the Pacific Northwest. He has been a faculty member at Capilano University in North Vancouver for the past thirty four years and has released six solo guitar recordings in such genres as Spanish, Baroque, Flamenco, South American and Classical Guitar music. He continues to study, compose, teach and concertize. 


        TUESDAY, MARCH 14
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Capilano Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        3045 Highland Boulevard, NV

        Enhancing Education with the “Digital Blur:” Engaging Students with Games like Pokemon Go

        Games like Pokemon Go use regular technology such as cell phones for playing games outside in the real world. A blend of on-line and reality (the “digital blur”) is engaging when we play for fun and when students play “serious games”, such as educational simulations, which can include all forms of modern communication. This presentation will focus on a role play simulation at McGill University, and how its design is used in a Capilano University course.

        Dr Nancy Nowlan

        Presenter: Dr. Nancy Nowlan   

         Dr. Nancy Nowlan teaches Management, Workplace Development and other courses in the School of Business and recently completed her doctorate in Education – Transformational Change at Simon Fraser University. She has presented at ISAGA, the International Simulation and Gaming Association and ABSEL, the Association of Business Simulations and Experiential Learning in 2016.


        TUESDAY, MARCH 28
        Burnaby Public Library, Bob Prittie Metrotown Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        6100 Willingdon Avenue, Bby

        KIZUNA: Creative Practices as Healing Aids for Human Suffering

        KIZUNA (Bond) is the Japanese word for appreciating the existence of others. How do we connect with each other creatively? How do we overcome deep grief? Since the Great East Japan Earthquake took many lives on March 11, 2011, I think, work, and cry from my liminal space. ‘Liminal’ comes from Latin limen, ‘threshold’: in between, transition, ambiguity. My research has shown that creative social acts like poetry, visual art, music and dialogue can help overcome some of this pain.

        Yoriko Gillard

        Presenter: Yoriko Gillard  

        Yoriko Gillard, a Japanese Instructor in the School of Humanities at Capilano University, is an artist, poet, language educator and educational researcher. She is a PhD student in Language and Literacy Education at UBC and investigating how creative communication helps people understand each other reciprocally during periods of hardship, cultural conflict, and language dissonance. Her current research initiatives include a HEARTH Project: hear/heart/art/earth and KIZUNA (Bond) activities.  


        TUESDAY, APRIL 11
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Parkgate Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        3675 Banff Court, NV

        The Medium’s Apprentice: A Psychologist Probes the Paranormal

        In every age and culture, people have had experiences that mystified them. Can the science of Psychology provide insights into these mysteries? In this presentation, Dr. George will share some of his adventures in Anomalistic Psychology, from working in a parapsychology lab and investigating hauntings to hunting for elves in Iceland to being trained as a Spiritualist medium.

        Dr Leonard George

        Presenter: Dr. Leonard George

        Dr. Leonard George received a Ph.D in Clinical Psychology from the University of Western Ontario. His career has included work as a psychologist in hospitals and clinics, and also as a researcher, writer, broadcaster and educator. He has been a faculty member at Capilano University for the past 12 years. The author of two books and many articles, he has given lectures and seminars across North America, Europe and the Middle East, and webinars online. In the summer of 2017, he plans to visit Mongolia to give some presentations and investigate shamanic practices there. 


        SATURDAY, APRIL 22
        Capilano University, Library building
        8:30 am – 3:15 pm

        Capilano University, 2055 Purcell Way, North Vancouver

        Special Event: Student Research Symposium

        Capilano University’s first student research symposium is a celebration of the diverse research projects completed by graduating students in the Bachelor of Arts in Applied Behaviour Analysis, Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies, Bachelor of Communication Studies, and Bachelor of Early Childhood Care and Education. Students will share their findings in a series of moderated student panel sessions.

        For further information please visit: capilanou.ca/studentresearch.


        WEDNESDAY, APRIL 26
        Burnaby Public Library, McGill Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        4595 Albert Street, Burnaby

        Women Behind Bars: Experience and Education in Women’s Prisons

        Incarcerated women are largely out of sight and thus forgotten. No longer part of their communities, they are the most marginalized in society. The intersection of sexism and racism victimizes women in prison. They are more likely to be younger, single, unemployed and without a high school diploma than Canadian women in general. But research shows that people who receive an education while jailed have a better chance of employment post-release and are less likely to return.

        Kirsten and Laurel

        Presenter: Kirsten McIlveen & Laurel Whitney 

        Laurel and Kirsten have worked for prisoner’s rights for over 25 years. Laurel has taught university courses in the BC Penitentiary and Matsqui Institution, and researched restorative justice as an alternative to incarceration. Kirsten has been visiting imprisoned women for 25 years with a group called Joint Effort. Kirsten has been a faculty member at Capilano University for 8 years, and Laurel for many years. They volunteer as life skills coaches for inmates on parole who have addictions problems. Their film about how paroled inmates benefit from community support was shown at a National Conference on Community Corrections. They teach a social sciences course to women in the Fraser Valley Institute, a women’s prison.


        WEDNESDAY, MAY 10
        North Vancouver City Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        120 14th Street West, NV

        Surfing the Grey Tsunami: Living and Helping with Dementia

        In 2015, Canada reached a tipping point: we officially have more senior citizens than children. Along with “the rising tide of the grey tsunami” comes a dramatic increase in the number of Canadians living with dementia. Health care providers proudly declare that they are giving “person-centred care”. But what does that mean, and can we truly provide it in a system that is ill equipped to cope? It’s time to rethink the way we care. .

        Nadja Neubauer

        Presenter: Nadja Neubauer   

        Nadja Neubauer is a Licensed Practical Nurse (BSN candidate) with an extensive background in nursing, gerontology, and education. She has been teaching Health Care Assistants at Capilano since 2011, and was a recipient of one of Capilano University’s “Exceptional Service Awards” in 2014. She is passionate about elder care and is happiest when bringing students from the classroom into North Shore residential care facilities.






        2016 SEASON

        TUESDAY, JANUARY 26
        West Vancouver Memorial Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        1950 Marine Drive, WV

        From Eden to Isil: The Eternal War For Control of the Imagination

        “Imagination rules the world.” ~~ Napoleon Bonaparte

        It’s an old truth: you can conquer with violence and fear; but to sustain victory, you must conquer from inside – you must rule the imagination. You must make it hard to imagine that things could be different. Imagination has the power to harm and heal, link and divide, enslave and free. In this presentation we will survey some of the ways that imagination’s power has been used through the centuries, and some of the battles for control of this power.

        Presenter: Dr. Leonard George

        Dr. Leonard George is the Chair of the Psychology Department at Capilano University, where he teaches a range of courses and organizes the annual Capilano Universe presentation series. He has given lectures and seminars across North America, Europe and the Middle East as well as online. Leonard has written two books and dozens of articles. Prior to his stint at Capilano he worked for many years as a clinical psychologist in both public and private sectors, and for several years was a regular voice on CBC Radio. He is well-travelled in body as well as in mind: for instance, at one point he resided in a Buddhist monastery in China; at another, his home base was a tomb in a cemetery in India. He witnessed a revolution in Greece in 1974, and another in Egypt in 2012. He is drawn to all things that are vast, intricate or make a 'mewing' sound.


        WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Lynn Valley Main Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        1277 Lynn Valley Road, NV

        I Know Not Why I Do: Unconscious Influences on Emotions, Decision-Making and Behaviour

        Much of human behaviour involves conscious and deliberate effort, yet just how much of it is due to unconscious influences? This talk explores how factors outside of awareness can affect our behaviour. We will also discuss influences on decision making, judgments, and emotions.

        Presenter: Dr. Danielle Labossière

        Dr. Danielle Labossière is a cognitive psychologist whose research interests are centred on human memory and performance and the interactions between attention, memory, and emotion. Her recent research has involved investigations into the consequences that recent perceptual and attentional experiences with stimuli with emotional dimensions have on perception.

        Danielle has been teaching at campuses across Canada since 2008 on a range of topics including cognition, memory, and emotion, at the University of Manitoba, Université Saint-Boniface, St. Thomas More College at the University of Saskatchewan, and Memorial University’s Grenfell Campus. She joined the Department of Psychology at Capilano University in 2014, where she has been teaching Cognition and Introduction to Psychology.


        WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Capilano Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        3045 Highland Boulevard, NV

        Legacy of a Secret War: How War's Aftermath Continues to Kill

        Between 1964 and 1973 the United States conducted a massive secret air war against Laos, making it the most heavily bombed country in history. This presentation features a showing of the film Bombies (which won first place awards at a dozen film festivals). The film explores the deadly legacy of the Laos campaign: 100 million unexploded cluster bombs, still killing villagers 50 years after they were dropped.

        Presenter: Jack Silberman

        Jack Silberman studied documentary filmmaking at MIT and has a Masters degree from Harvard. He has made documentaries for Canadian broadcasters, Discovery Channel, National Geographic, PBS, United Nations agencies, and others. His films have been broadcast on tv networks around the world and have won more than 60 awards. He teaches directing and producing, and also mentors students, in the Documentary Film Program at Capilano University.


        TUESDAY, MARCH 22
        Burnaby Public Library, Bob Prittie Metrotown Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        6100 Willingdon Avenue, Bby

        Active Vancouver: Exploring Outdoor Recreation in the City's Natural Environment

        In his new book Active Vancouver, Roy Jantzen profiles a variety of activities—cycling, trail running, hiking, snowshoeing, paddling, picnicking, and more—all within a day trip of Vancouver. The book provides the reader with all the information they need to plan a fun, safe, active, and environmentally education-rich day. Roy’s talk will guide the audience to local and regional areas as he focusses on both the recreation and environmental education components of Active Vancouver.

        Presenter: Roy Jantzen

        Roy Jantzen is a professor of Natural History at Capilano University in the Faculty of Global and Community Studies. For over two decades, Roy has helped educate the public about the importance of our biodiverse areas and our human place in them, and he sees this book as an extension of that effort. Though he has a passion for local ecosystems and the species that encompass them, he also has a strong desire for exercise and recreation. And he sees Metro Vancouver as one of the most accessible regions on the planet for access to green space to facilitate his love of both. Roy holds a Master of Environmental Education and Communication through Royal Roads University and asks, “Shouldn’t all education be environmental education?


        WEDNESDAY, APRIL 20
        North Vancouver District Public Library, Parkgate Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        3675 Banff Court, NV

        Towers of Song: The European Adventures of the Capilano University Singers

        Did you know that the Capilano University Singers go to Europe every two years, giving concerts at major sacred and secular venues? Previously they have sung in Spain, Italy, Czech Republic, Austria, and Germany, performing pieces composed specifically for the venues. In 2015 they went to France, performing at Notre Dame Cathedral and La Madeleine in Paris, the Canadian monument at Vimy Ridge, and several locales in the South of France. Dr. Wendy Grant will showcase some of the performances recorded from the tour and praise the twin adventures of music and travel.

        Presenter: Dr. Wendy Grant

        Dr. Wendy Grant completed her PhD in historical musicology at the University of Victoria in 2000, having won the Governor General’s Gold Medal for her work on the music of Henry Purcell. She has been part of Capilano University’s Music Diploma faculty for 16 years. As a specialist in music history, it is a special thrill for her to accompany students as they investigate the actual churches and courts for which the music they are singing was written.


        WEDNESDAY, APRIL 27
        Burnaby Public Library, McGill Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        4595 Albert Street, Bby

        New Frontiers in Special Education

        Students, parents and teachers involved in Special Education face many challenges. In this presentation, Dr. Linda McDonnell will review current issues and the latest research (including her own). She will share suggestions on how parents, school staff and community professionals can work as Individual Education Plan teams to foster students' goal-setting and achievement.

        Presenter: Dr. Linda McDonnell

        Dr. Linda McDonnell is a faculty member in the Department of Education at Capilano University. She earned undergraduate and Masters degrees in Special Education with the University of New Mexico, and completed completed the Leadership/Curriculum and Instruction Doctoral Program with the University of Phoenix. She is the author of Barriers That Prevent the Alignment of The Individual Education Plan with Inclusion Classroom Practice. After extensive research on the Individual Education Plan, she conducted a study at Roberts Creek Elementary School on the Sunshine Coast into the challenges of aligning the individual education plan with classroom practice. Linda recently taught Working in Schools, a course for the Sunshine Coast Indian band (SIB) Education Assistant Program at Capilano University. Currently she supervises the SIB Education Assistant practicum for the Education Assistant Program at Capilano University on the Sunshine Coast.


        TUESDAY, MAY 10
        North Vancouver City Library
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        120 14th Street West, NV

        A Ribbon of Steel or a String of Pearls? Women Building Community Along BC's Kettle Valley Railway

        One hundred years ago, the Kettle Valley Railway was pushed through the rugged land of BC’s interior to secure an all-Canadian route through southern BC. Spaced along this sinuous line were ‘section houses’, simple dwellings separated by miles from each other, which housed the workers (and often their families) who were responsible for rail maintenance. This presentation will explore how the inhabitants of these isolated whistle-stops were part of an elongated CPR ‘company town’, and how women were instrumental in building community in this challenging setting.

        Presenter: Jeanne Mikita

        Jeanne has taught a wide variety of courses in her 22 years at Capilano University – in the Departments of Geography, Women’s & Gender Studies, and in the Global Stewardship Program. As a geographer, she has always been interested in the interplay between humans and landscape, and the forces that push people from one part of the world to another. Her earlier research focused on the migration of Filipina nannies to Vancouver, but more recently, she has turned her attention to the movements and place-making activities of the people who worked on BC’s historic Kettle Valley Railway.



        2015 SEASON


        WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14
        North Vancouver District Public Library: Lynn Valley Branch
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        1277 Lynn Valley Rd, North Vancouver

        The Archetypal Psychology of Game of Thrones

        The Game of Thrones series (A Song of Ice and Fire, by George R.R. Martin) is set in a fantasy world of adventure and mystery, magic and sorcery, with noble heroes and heroines, good and evil queens and kings, lords and ladies, with terrifying monsters, with old gods and new gods, beautiful princesses needing rescue and some who can kick butt with the best of them. And, of course, dragons. It is a Hero’s Journey, of redemption and vengeance, saviours and destroyers, descent into cold darkness begun with the ominous motto, “Winter is Coming”, and, ultimately, to transformation. ButThe Game of Thrones is not the first epic tale of heroes and heroines. The Hero/Heroine is an ancient archetype in myth, legend and story that crosses eras and cultures, according to Carl G. Jung, the Swiss psychiatrist, and to Joseph Campbell, the mythologist. Come and join us on a winter’s night for a journey of discovery of these universal archetypes in story and myth that have endured in our psyches from ancient times to the modern world, across time and space as vast as Westeros.

        Presenter: Janet Waters

        Dr. Janet Waters has been a psychology instructor at Capilano University since 1987, a psychotherapist since 1984. In her spare time, when not mentally traveling in Westeros or Middle Earth, has been reading and writing science fiction and fantasy for as long as she has been studying Jungian psychology. She was recently asked to play a Crone in a Halloween play - and doesn't quite know what to think about that.


        Wednesday, February 18
        West Vancouver Memorial Library
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        1950 Marine Drive, West Vancouver

        Memory and Retention: Optimizing Your Brain's Abilities (Whatever Your Age)

        Optimizing our ability to recall information improves our ability to function as a student and a life-long learner. Regardless of age, adopting approaches to enhance neural mechanisms to remember information is beneficial. Tracy's clinical background working with neurological conditions as a Physiotherapist, her post-secondary teaching experience at Capilano University and her keen interest in the science of memory provide her with a highly practical perspective into memory facilitation.

        Presenter: Tracy Dignum, BSc (Physiotherapy), MEd - Co-coordinator and Instructor, Rehabilitation Assistant Diploma Program

        Tracy is a Physiotherapist and teaches in the Rehab Assistant Diploma Program. She teaches courses in Gerontology, with dementia as a key topic, and also in Anatomy. She has a strong interest in memory and retention, which has led to several workshops on topics relating to memory and retention and a TEDx talk as well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GlxVePiMfeI. Her Capilano e-portfolio can be viewed at: https://zenportfolios.ca/tdignum/.


        WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
        North Vancouver District Public Library: Capilano Branch
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        3045 Highland Boulevard, North Vancouver

        Building Connections with Vietnam Hill Tribes

        For over a decade Capilano University has led community tourism training projects in the Sapa Region of Northern Vietnam. Chris had the great fortune of being a part of these projects. He began as a student volunteer during his undergrad at Cap U. He is currently co-leading the project which has recently received funding to continue for another year. The projects see volunteer students and faculty from Cap U collaborate with Hanoi Open University (HOU) students in faculty in the development and delivery of training in hill tribe communities in Sapa. The goals of the project are to foster opportunities in the village related to employment and small business development, reduce poverty, increase quality of life, and create a sustainable tourism product. Key to the success of the project has been the many connections and relationships that have been built along the way. There have been significant connections made between Cap U and HOU; the project team (Cap U and HOU) and the villages; one community to another community; and the communities with private sector companies. This relationship is in some ways the critical factor in ensuring that the community product reaches the tourists. The presentation will include a discussion of the project, highlighting the significant connections mentioned above. It will end with a short documentary telling the story of the how the project facilitated village entrepreneurs traveling to Hanoi (some for the first time) to meet with the tour operators.

        Presenter: Chris Carnovale, BTM (Capilano University); MACD-I (University of Victoria) in process

        Convenor, Outdoor Recreation Management; Instructor, Tourism Management and Outdoor Recreation Management Programs; Co- Project Manager, Vietnam Community Tourism Training Project; Faculty of Global & Community Studies

        A grad from Capilano University’s Tourism Management Degree Program, and currently completing a Master of Arts in Community Development at the Univeristy of Victoria, Chris isn’t letting up his ambitious pace and continues to find new ways to challenge himself. From being involved in a variety of community-based volunteer efforts in Vietnam and Paraguay, to working with sea turtles in Central America, to coordinating the development of a Destination Marketing Organization in Tanzania, to taking on various roles in Whistler and Vancouver, he has continually discovered new venues to enhance his experience in the field of tourism. His areas of interest and expertise lie in cross cultural studies, community development, urban planning, and social media. In addition to teaching Cross Cultural Tourism at Cap U, Chris is currently co-managing Capilano’s Vietnam Tourism Training Project, generously funded by the PATA Foundation. The project will work collectively with small communities, local government and tourism private sector to build capacity and better manage the opportunities that tourism can bring.


        TUESDAY, MARCH 24
        Burnaby Public Library, Bob Prittie Metrotown Branch
        7:00 - 8:45pm

        6100 Willingdon Avenue, Burnaby

        Musical Nature: Making Art of Music Analysis

        Have you ever wondered what your favorite pieces of music might "look like"? Come and "see", with a bit of a music theorist's "mind's eye", if a picture really might be "worth a thousand notes" ... and maybe even have a favorite piece of music of your own in mind, and find out what kinds of designs it might generate! During her recent educational leave from Capilano University, Grace undertook the book project "Musical Nature - Making Art of Music Analysis", based on the idea that music heard to be "beautiful", patterned, or even just "interesting", could be shown and seen to be so. She has been working on seven Musical Nature "gallery-chapters”, each featuring a different way of making designs to music. The results range from tree-like constructions to wheeling constellations, abstract animated figures to color-coded chord towers and delicate web and mollusk-like tracings. Each type of design comes from noticing features of the music while listening, and responding to it “live”, on canvas, paper or with music or design software.

        Presenter: Grace McNab

        Capilano University Faculty member, instructing music theory, aural skills and keyboard skills in the Diploma in Music and Jazz Studies programs.

        Grace McNab has been teaching music theory and aural skills courses at Capilano University since 1989, and served as Coordinator of the Bachelor of Music in Jazz Studies from 1998-2013. A pianist with a Master’s Degree in Music theory, she has also studied architecture, drawing and painting, conducting, and the Brazilian game/dance/martial art of Capoeira, as well as working on personal professional development in composition and jazz improvisation. To enhance her teaching of music theory, she has been drawn towards various kinds of expressive visual diagrams to portray aspects of music such as phrase structure, harmonic progression and overall musical form.


        WEDNESDAY, APRIL 15
        North Vancouver District Public Library: Parkgate Branch
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        675 Banff Court, North Vancouver

        A Ribbon of Steel or a String of Pearls? Women Building Community ALong BC's Kettle Valley Railway

        One hundred years ago, the Kettle Valley Railway was pushed through the rugged land of BC’s interior to secure an all-Canadian route through southern BC. Spaced along this sinuous line were ‘section houses’, simple dwellings separated by miles from each other, which housed the workers (and often their families) who were responsible for rail maintenance. This presentation will explore how the inhabitants of these isolated whistle-stops were part of an elongated CPR ‘company town’, and how women were instrumental in building community in this challenging setting.

        Presenter: Jeanne Mikita

        Jeanne has taught a wide variety of courses in her 21 years at Capilano University - in the departments of Geography, Women & Gender Studies, and in the Global Stewardship Program. As a geographer, she has always been interested in the interplay between humans and landscape, and the forces that push people from one part of the world to another. Her earlier research focused on the migration of Filipina nannies to Vancouver, but more recently, she has turned her attention to the movements and place-making activities of the people who worked on BC’s historic Kettle Valley Railway.


        WEDNESDAY, APRIL 22
        Burnaby Public Library: McGill Branch
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        4595 Albert Street, Burnaby

        The Pursuit of Happiness: What Researchers Have Learned

        Abraham Lincoln famously said “You are as happy as you make up your mind to be”. Is it really this simple? What role do our beliefs play in creating happiness? What other factors influence how happy we are? Are some people born with a predisposition to be happy? What is the difference between what people think will make them happy and what actually makes them happy? In this presentation, Capilano University counsellor Sukhi Sohi will delve into these questions and highlight some of the latest research findings.

        Presenter: Sukhi Sohi, B.A. (English literature), M.A. (Counselling Psychology)

        Sukhi has been working at Capilano University as a counsellor and instructor since 1993. As a university counsellor, she works with students who are struggling or experiencing obstacles to their success. The question of how to move from experiencing stress, depression, anxiety or discontent to a happier, more successful and fulfilling life is a constant theme in her work. She enjoys exploring and understanding the role that self-awareness plays in helping people to create a greater sense of well-being.


        TUESDAY, MAY 12
        North Vancouver City Library
        7:00 - 8:45 pm

        120 West 14th Street, North Vancouver

        Music for Life: Stories of Music Therapy

        Music can touch us deeply: calming or energizing us, helping to coordinate our bodies and minds, giving voice to our deeper emotions, lifting our spirits. These gifts of music, when tailor-made to be accessible and motivating to people in the midst of challenging life circumstances, are the foundation of the profession of Music Therapy. Join two Music Therapy educators from Capilano University (where it has been taught for over 40 years), as they share stories from their work that demonstrate music as a pathway to health and human development, and kindle your passionate curiosity about some of the deeper experiences of music.

        Presenters:

        Nancy McMaster, MA (MTh), M.T.A., F.A.M.I.
        Co-founder of the Music Therapy program at Capilano and concert performer xNancy McMaster, MTA, MA (MTh), FAMI, N-R certified, is a co-founder and faculty member of the Music Therapy program at Capilano University, and an instructor of Guided Imagery and Music (G.I.M.) trainings across Canada. She has worked with children with a range of challenges, and currently has a private practice using music psychotherapy approaches with adults. Nancy is an international author and speaker in the field of Music Therapy, and a performing and recording musician.

        Kevin Kirkland, PhD, M.T.A., F.A.M.I.
        Dr. Kevin Kirkland is an instructor of music therapy at Capilano University in North Vancouver, BC. He also works as an accredited music therapist in concurrent disorders at the Burnaby Centre for Mental Health and Addiction. He is completing research on music and brain function with persons with Alzheimer Disease in conjunction with the Department of Neurology at the University of British Columbia Hospital and recently published the International Dictionary of Music Therapy.




        2014 SEASON


        Behind the Lightning Mask: Modern Psychology and Ancient Oracles

        The word 'ecstasy' comes from the Greek 'ekstasis': a condition in which we are extricated from our stasis, or ordinary state of mind. Psychologists have studied ecstatic experiences to learn what triggers them, what shapes their content, and what functions they might serve. We can take this modern knowledge and apply it to mysteries of the past. For instance, ecstatic experiences played a role in ancient oracles at places like Delphi, Didyma and Claros. The nature of the diviners' trance-like states remains a matter of conjecture. A vital yet neglected clue lies in a text known as The Chaldean Oracles, likely dating from the 2nd century CE, which survives only in fragments. An extant passage gives a vivid description of an oracular experience - the only known such account. We open a window into the minds of our ancestors by bringing the findings of modern Psychology to bear on this ancient evidence.

        Presenter: Dr. Leonard George

        Leonard George, Ph.D. is Chair of Capilano University's Psychology Department. His areas of specialization within Psychology include Abnormal Psychology, Anomalistic Psychology, Health Psychology and History of Psychology. He has authored two books and many articles, and given lectures and seminars across North America, Europe and the Middle East. In 2008 he visited the ancient ruins of the Temple of Bel in Apamea, Syria - the place where The Chaldean Oracleswere likely composed.


        Journeys to Jinhua: Cross-Cultural Teaching in China

        In an age of trans-global education the influx and exodus of both students and teachers has risen dramatically. What contributes to effective strategies in cross-cultural teaching? This presentation follows the journeys of Catherine A. Evans to Jinhua, China to instruct students in Hospitality & Tourism studies. Catherine will share her experiences delivering curriculum across the language and cultural divide, showcasing the methods that have led to success, and those that might still be a work in progress. The evening will also present the beauty of a land that exudes culture and intrigue as experienced via foot, train, bus and boat.

        Presenter: Catherine Evans, MA, B.Sc.

        Catherine Evans is a Faculty member of Capilano University's Global and Community Studies Department.Catherine is also a small business owner of an international travel company, Tours of Exploration. For 25 years, she has applied a mission of "enriching lives through nature & cultural travel", linking conscientious travelers to like-minded hosts in remote destinations on all seven continents. Over the years, Catherine has journeyed to destinations in Canada, Central & South America, Australia, the South Pacific and Asia - travelling with groups, with her husband and their three children, or on her own. During her years in the travel industry she and her company have been the subject of numerous film, magazine and news articles owing to both innovation and excellence in travel practices.


        The Quest for Obtainium: A Sculptural Repurposing

        As one of 7 Capilano University Faculty members in Studio Art, George Rammell has taught Drawing and Sculpture since 1990. Every year he has challenged students to re-purpose found materials. His encouragement to respond, adapt and collaborate with "obtainium" (anything he could obtain for free), resulted in freedom for students to explore 3-dimensional experiments on an architectural scale. He promoted improvisation and open deadlines, encouraging students to take responsibility and ownership of their practices. His students' works were often located in unexpected places contributing to pedestrian encounters throughout the campus and the larger community. Mr. Rammell also kept the doors open between Drawing and Sculpture, exposing participants to a crossover of disciplines, innovations and traditions. In this presentation he will provide an illustrated seminar of extraordinary student sculptural experiments that have enriched the institution for several decades. Mr. Rammell will convey how the loss of the Studio Art and Textiles Programs will greatly reduce the diversity of education on the North Shore.

        Presenter: George Rammell

        George Rammell was born in Cranbrook. B.C. in 1952, and studied at the Vancouver School of Art (ECUAD) from 1971-75. He has been active as a sculptor and art instructor since 1975. He taught through the Emily Carr Institute over an 8-year period. Mr. Rammell has worked as a studio sculptor for a number of prominent artists, including Haida artist Bill Reid, with whom he worked on 14 projects includingThe Raven and the First Men and The Spirit of Haida Gwaii. In addition to two European sculpture symposia, Mr. Rammell has participated in 18 exhibitions including a solo show entitled Two Works at the Charles H. Scott Gallery in Vancouver. He recently completed a large mixed-media work entitled Ursus Arctos, The Persistence of Instinct. He is currently a Faculty member with the Studio Art Program at Capilano University.


        The Social Psychology of Rioting

        What psychological forces can turn a peaceful gathering into a violent riot? What common threads tie together riots triggered by such differing situations as sporting events and political oppression? Are riots better understood as incidents of mindless violence or as meaningful communicative acts following inverted social norms? How has the advent of social media changed the dynamics of rioting? What, if anything, might law enforcement services do differently in response to rioting, in light of the research? If the Canucks ever get to another game seven, what could be done to prevent another riot occurring? Dr. Hammond Tarry, a psychology instructor with a particular interest in the social dynamics of antisocial behaviour, will delve into these and other questions.

        Presenter: Dr. Hammond Tarry

        Dr. Hammond Tarry studied Psychology at the University of Oxford in the U.K., before working in corrections for a number of years, prior to emigrating to Canada in 2006. He has worked as an instructor in the Psychology Department at Capilano University since 2007. His research interests include antisocial behaviour, moral development, reputation management and political identity.


        Children: How They Sleep and How They Dream

        Sleep is important for children's health and development. Children who do not get enough sleep can have difficulty reaching age-appropriate milestones or, for school-aged children, poor academic performance. This seminar provides useful information for families to help their children get adequate sleep and includes the latest research on sleep and dreaming for infants and toddlers, the importance of sleep for children, tips to help children sleep better, and an opportunity to ask questions.

        Presenter: Jennifer Garden

        Jennifer is an Instructor and Fieldwork Manager for the Rehabilitation Assistant Diploma at Capilano University as well as being the founder of SleepdreamsTM Inc., a group of paediatric Registered Occupational Therapists specialised in addressing sleep problems for infants and children. Jennifer has worked professionally in paediatrics for children and infants since 1996 and her educational credentials include an undergraduate degree in Human Kinetics at the University of British Columbia, a Master of Clinical Science in Occupational Therapy from the University of Western Ontario, and a Master of Science at the University of British Columbia. She has also taken course credits as a breast feeding counsellor and specializes in sensory processing. Jennifer, the proud mother of preschool-aged twins, is actively involved in sleep research in British Columbia (Children's Hospital Sleep Research Team), has presented at several national conferences on sleep, and has provided in-services for other health professionals on sleep.


        The Wounded Metropolis: Depications of World War 1 Veterans by Otto Dix and George Grosz

        The first technologized war resulted in horrific physical injuries and psychic damage to soldiers. Trainloads of the disfigured returned to German cities, but the Fatherland didn't want to be reminded of its loss. Dix and Grosz make veteran bodies visible and impossible to ignore. They comment on the absurdity of a modernity which demands patriotic enlistment but cannot afford to care for the injured who return, resulting in many veterans begging on the street or protesting for their pensions as the currency plummets. What do Dix And Grosz reveal about this troubled moment in German history and its relation to art practice?

        Presenter: Sandra Seekins

        Sandra Seekins has been teaching at Capilano University since 2001 in both the Art History Department and in Women's and Gender studies. Her M.A. is from UBC and she has done further graduate work at the University of Michigan (ABD). Her research areas are art and technology, activism and art, and art and trauma. She has given numerous talks and guest lectures, published an article and a poem inThe Capilano Review,contributed essays to exhibition catalogues, and been co-curator of two exhibitions at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.


        Children of Air India: Un-authorized Exhibits and Interjections

        Renée Sarojini Saklikar was 23 years old when her aunt and uncle were murdered on June 23, 1985 in the bombing of Air India Flight 182 which exploded off the west coast of Ireland en route from Montreal to London and Delhi. In her first book of poems, children of air india: un/authorized exhibits and interjections, Ms. Saklikar presents a powerful and deeply personal collection in a series of elegiac sequences exploring the nature of individual loss, situated within public trauma. Ms. Saklikar's voice offers a fresh perspective on a heartbreaking chapter in Canada's history-the bombing of Air India Flight 182 killed all 329 passengers and crew, including 82 children under the age of 13. The aftermath of our country's worst act of terrorism is at once over-reported and under-represented in the collective psyche of our culture. Canada still lives with the repercussions of the event and with the government's response to this tragedy where 268 Canadian as well as British and Indians citizens lost their lives. Ms. Saklikar's work bears witness to this atrocity. children of air india is animated by a proposition: that personal and shared violence reverberates in our lives and finds us, even when we choose to be unaware or indifferent.

        Presenters: Renée Saklikar, with Commentary by Capilano University Faculty Members Melanie Fahlman Reid, Ed Lavalle and Reg Johanson

        Melanie Fahlman-Reid is a Vancouver native and longtime member of the English Department at Capilano University. She has worked with English as Additional Language learners and presented at conferences in Ontario, British Columbia, California and New York, and coauthored a text on working with this learning community. Her particular literary interests include medieval and apocalyptic literature; her interest in the long poem stretches fromBeowulf tochildren of air india. She believes that the literary responses to the Air India bombing, its impact on the construct of what it means to be Canadian and the ongoing responses to that tragedy by the Canadian government and press open a profoundly moving and important dialogue with us all. She has been a story teller withRainCity Chronicles and is an enthusiastic supporter of the storytelling. Eduard M. Lavalleteaches International Relations, International Law and Political Studies at Capilano University, including courses in the European Union. He has substantial background in the Middle East and South Asia. He is a former director of programs with the Shastri Indo-Canadian Institute and has lived and worked in India. Reg Johanson, a member of the English/ Creative Writing department at Capilano University is a practicing poet with multiple publications as the co-author ofN 49 19. 47 - W 123 8. 11 (PILLS 2008), a collection of his work titled Courage, My Love (Line Books, 2006), critical work on, and an interview with, Marie Annharte Baker has appeared in the anthology Antiphonies (The Gig, 2008) and in The Capilano Review 3 / 10. Reg's work on Standard English as a classist and racializing disciplinary practice, and on the political economy of "cheating" and plagiarism,and on on "the radical" in poetry, on representations of missing women, global urbanization, and radical pedagogy have appeared in many publications.


        Journeys yo Jinhua: Cross-Cultural Teaching in China

        In an age of trans-global education the influx and exodus of both students and teachers has risen dramatically. What contributes to effective strategies in cross-cultural teaching? This presentation follows the journeys of Catherine A. Evans to Jinhua, China to instruct students in Hospitality & Tourism studies. Catherine will share her experiences delivering curriculum across the language and cultural divide, showcasing the methods that have led to success, and those that might still be a work in progress. The evening will also present the beauty of a land that exudes culture and intrigue as experienced via foot, train, bus and boat.

        Presenter: Catherine Evans, MA, B.Sc.

        Catherine Evans is a Faculty member of Capilano University's Global and Community Studies Department.Catherine is also a small business owner of an international travel company, Tours of Exploration. For 25 years, she has applied a mission of "enriching lives through nature & cultural travel", linking conscientious travelers to like-minded hosts in remote destinations on all seven continents. Over the years, Catherine has journeyed to destinations in Canada, Central & South America, Australia, the South Pacific and Asia - travelling with groups, with her husband and their three children, or on her own. During her years in the travel industry she and her company have been the subject of numerous film, magazine and news articles owing to both innovation and excellence in travel practices.


        Landscape with the Fall of Icarus: The Challenge of Alternative Technology

        This talk examines Pieter Bruegel the elder's painting "Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" as a challenge to how we think about technology in the 21st century. Rather than being a dramatization of a well-known story, Bruegel's painting seems to offer a summary of the ethical, political, and environmental challenges of an advanced technological society. It also indicates a direction for an alternative way of thinking about and pursuing technology that addresses some of the risks associated with broad-based technological innovation that our societies face today.

        Presenter: Dr. Edward Hamilton

        Dr. Hamilton is co-Chair of the School of Communication at Capilano University. His areas of teaching and research include communication theory, philosophy of technology, media history and cultural studies. His Ph.D., completed at Simon Fraser University, dealt with online education and reform initiatives in the university. His current research deals with the history of the university as a media system.




        2013 SEASON


        Can Creativity be Learned?

        Many organizations are collaborating with creative professionals as they explore ways to increase innovation and release creative potential in their employees. This presentation explores what is meant by creativity, demystifies the creative process, and offers some hands-on exercises that challenge the audience to look at things differently. Carol will also share some student responses to a creative challenge.

        Presenter: Carol Aiken

        Carol is a design professional who has lived and worked in several countries over the course of her career. She obtained her BA in Graphic Design in London, England, and completed a Masters in Publishing at SFU after moving to Canada. She is currently Chair of the School of Art & Design at Capilano University where she teaches Creative Thinking, Typography, and Portfolio Development in the IDEA (Design and Illustration) program.


        The Medium's Apprentice: A Psychologist Explores Spiritualism from the Inside

        Spiritualism: a religion (founded in 19th century America, now world-wide) based on the belief that it is possible for the living to contact the dead. Medium: a specialist in passing messages from the dearly departed to the living, and in giving other evidence for the reality of a spirit world. What does it feel like to be a medium? What do mediums experience when they "meet a spirit"? Dr. Leonard George decided to find out. This past summer he journeyed to a village of Spiritualists in upstate New York to be trained by renowned medium Dr. Judith Rochester. He figured he could study the psychological processes of mediumistic experience from the inside, and, just maybe, get to talk to dead people. In this presentation, Dr. George will review the amazing history of Spiritualism, note what psychologists know about mediumistic phenomena, and report on his role as the medium's apprentice.

        Presenter: Dr. Leonard George

        Leonard George, Ph.D. is a Faculty member of Capilano University's Psychology Department, and also teaches in the Music Therapy degree program. He has authored two books and many articles, given lectures and seminars across North America, Europe and the Middle East (including a series in Egypt this past June), and is co-organizing a conference in Sicily in June 2013. He is intrigued by anything that is vast, intricate or emits a 'mewing' sound.


        Stroke and the New Promise of Neuor-Plasticity

        Stroke is caused by a decreased blood supply or a hemorrhage in the brain. Substantial recovery is observed in the first 6 months after the event. However, stroke survivors may be left with disabling effects long afterward. These difficulties can leave a person dependent on caregivers to attend to their activities of daily living. Recent research into neuro-plasticity (the capacity of the brain to change in response to experience) aims to help stroke survivors by enabling them to become independent through advanced therapies. This presentation will address some of these advances.

        Presenter: Vineet Johnson

        Vineet Johnson, B.Sc.PT, PG.Dip.PT, M.Sc., Ph.D. candidate at McGill University, Faculty, Dept. of Human Kinetics, Capilano University. Vineet graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Physiotherapy from Christian Medical College, Vellore, TN, India. Thereafter he completed a post-graduate diploma in Physiotherapy, from Queen Margaret University College, Edinburgh, Scotland followed by a Master of Science in Kinesiology (specialty Neurophysiology) from Simon Fraser University. Vineet is currently pursuing his Ph.D. at McGill University in Neuro-Rehabilitation. He started teaching at Capilano University in 2005. Vineet has also worked at Simon Fraser University as an Instructor / teaching assistant.


        Children: How They Sleep and How They Dream

        Sleep is important for children's health and development. Children who do not get enough sleep can have difficulty reaching age-appropriate milestones or, for school-aged children, poor academic performance. This seminar provides useful information for families to help their children get adequate sleep and includes the latest research on sleep and dreaming for infants and toddlers, the importance of sleep for children, tips to help children sleep better, and an opportunity to ask questions.

        Presenter: Jennifer Garden

        Jennifer is an Instructor and Fieldwork Manager for the Rehabilitation Assistant Diploma at Capilano University as well as being the founder of SleepdreamsTM Inc., a group of paediatric Registered Occupational Therapists specialised in addressing sleep problems for infants and children. Jennifer has worked professionally in paediatrics for children and infants since 1996 and her educational credentials include an undergraduate degree in Human Kinetics at the University of British Columbia, a Master of Clinical Science in Occupational Therapy from the University of Western Ontario, and a Master of Science at the University of British Columbia. She has also taken course credits as a breast feeding counsellor and specializes in sensory processing. Jennifer, the proud mother of preschool-aged twins, is actively involved in sleep research in British Columbia (Children's Hospital Sleep Research Team), has presented at several national conferences on sleep, and has provided in-services for other health professionals on sleep.


        The Demise of the Public University

        Dr. Kris Bulcroft, President of Capilano University, will offer a provocative assessment of the state of public institutions in British Columbia. Instead of focusing on the economic challenges that face colleges and universities throughout the world, the talk will provide an opportunity for dialogue with community members and the chance to engage in a discussion around the hopes and aspirations for public institutions in BC. Kris will share her thoughts on how universities can respond to the changing needs of students and communities in the 21st century and will offer some insight into the future of public universities in our province.

        Presenter: Dr. Kris Bulcroft

        Kris Bulcroft, Ph.D. is a sociologist specializing in aging and family. Her research career includes publications on later life dating and courtship, divorce and remarriage in later life, guardianship laws and family impacts, and the role of pets over the family life course. She is currently the President and Vice Chancellor at Capilano University.


        Secrets of the Forest: An Archaeologist Explores the North Shore

        Archaeological work in North Vancouver’s Seymour Valley has revealed an unexpected and interesting history of early 20th century life in the now heavily forested valley. Archaeologist Bob Muckle provides an overview of what he and his students have discovered and exhibits a few dozen of the more than 2,000 artifacts recovered from the ground where early residences and logging camps once stood. Artifacts include a piece of camera excavated from within the walls of a buried bathhouse in a secret Japanese camp. Other archaeological activities discussed include accidently finding a marijuana grow-op and evaluating a purported sasquatch lair.

        Presenter: Bob Muckle

        Bob’s primary research and teaching interests include the Indigenous Peoples of North America, human evolution, and all things archaeological. Bob is passionate about research, teaching, and writing. He has worked extensively with First Nations, mostly in British Columbia. Excavation projects he has worked on include a Greek site in Egypt; dozens of prehistoric sites throughout British Columbia, Alberta, and Alaska; and multiple early 20th century Japanese camps near Vancouver. By his own estimation, he has taught anthropology and archaeology to more than 5,000 college and university students in classes of 35 or less. Bob directs the Seymour Valley Archaeology Project, which focuses on documenting early 20th century heritage sites in the Lower Seymour Conservation Reserve; contributes to a more complete picture of local, regional, and Asian-American history; and trains university students in field archaeology. Field work occurs each May and June with students enrolled in the Archaeology Field School. Books he has written include Introducing Archaeology; The First Nations of British Columbia: An Anthropological Survey; and Indigenous Peoples of North America: A Concise Anthropological Overview. He has also edited the book Reading Archaeology, and has been a regular columnist for three periodicals: Anthropology News, Teaching Anthropology, and Popular Anthropology Magazine.


        Biologically-Respectful Tourism and Environmental Stewardship

        The Sunshine Coast is presented as a case study to explore the relationship between biological diversity, tourism and the role community organizations have played in promoting environmental stewardship among both residents and visitors. The Sunshine Coast is a region with strong conservation values. What contributes to effective strategies in biologically-respectful practices? This presentation summarizes research undertaken by Catherine A. Evans through to early 2012 investigating over 20 conservation groups involved in 40 plus environmentally themed projects. Catherine will present ideas on how to bridge the disparity between what people say they value, actions that result in protection, and respectful tourism practices.

        Presenter: Catherine Evans

        Catherine Evans is a Faculty member of Capilano University's Global and Community Studies Department. Catherine is also a small business owner of an international travel company, Tours of Exploration. For over 20 years, she has applied a mission of "enriching lives through nature & cultural travel" achieving this by linking conscientious travelers to like-minded hosts in remote destinations on all seven continents. Three innovative initiatives that earned recognition were a multi-disciplined arts retreat in the BC wilderness; a volunteerism project with whale researchers in both the Atlantic and Pacific waters; and an ecotourism project with three communities in rural Costa Rica. In 1998 CBC's Marketplace sent a film crew with one of her Peru trips and awarded the company "10/10" for their "Ecotourism practices". Over the years, Catherine and her company have been the subject of numerous magazine, newspaper, radio and television coverage showcasing aspects of innovation, exploration and experiential travel. Catherine lives on the Sunshine Coast along with her husband Matthew and their three children.


        THIS TALK WAS CANCELLED

        Art and the Challenge of Alternative Technology: Landscape with the Fall of Icarus

        This talk examines Pieter Breugel the elder's painting ";Landscape with the Fall of Icarus" as a challenge to how we think about technology in the 21st century. Rather than being a dramatization of a well-known story, Breugel's painting seems to offer a summary of the ethical, political, and environmental challenges of an advanced technological society. It also indicates a direction for an alternative way of thinking about and pursuing technology that addresses some of the risks associated with broad-based technological innovation that our societies face today.

        Presenter: Dr. Edward Hamilton

        Dr. Hamilton is co-Chair of the School of Communication at Capilano University. His areas of teaching and research include communication theory, philosophy of technology, media history and cultural studies. His Ph.D., completed at Simon Fraser University, dealt with online education and reform initiatives in the university. His current research deals with the history of the university as a media system.


        Biologically-Respectful Tourism and Environmental Stewardship

        The Sunshine Coast is presented as a case study to explore the relationship between biological diversity, tourism and the role community organizations have played in promoting environmental stewardship among both residents and visitors. The Sunshine Coast is a region with strong conservation values. What contributes to effective strategies in biologically-respectful practices? This presentation summarizes research undertaken by Catherine A. Evans through to early 2012 investigating over 20 conservation groups involved in 40 plus environmentally themed projects. Catherine will present ideas on how to bridge the disparity between what people say they value, actions that result in protection, and respectful tourism practices.

        Presenter: Catherine Evans

        Catherine Evans is a Faculty member of Capilano University's Global and Community Studies Department. Catherine is also a small business owner of an international travel company, Tours of Exploration. For over 20 years, she has applied a mission of "enriching lives through nature & cultural travel" achieving this by linking conscientious travelers to like-minded hosts in remote destinations on all seven continents. Three innovative initiatives that earned recognition were a multi-disciplined arts retreat in the BC wilderness; a volunteerism project with whale researchers in both the Atlantic and Pacific waters; and an ecotourism project with three communities in rural Costa Rica. In 1998 CBC's Marketplace sent a film crew with one of her Peru trips and awarded the company "10/10" for their "Ecotourism practices". Over the years, Catherine and her company have been the subject of numerous magazine, newspaper, radio and television coverage showcasing aspects of innovation, exploration and experiential travel. Catherine lives on the Sunshine Coast along with her husband Matthew and their three children.